Dienstag, 14. Januar 2014

The Basic Self-help Guide To Beginning A Job As A Registered Nurse

A high quality registered nurse will never be lacking for work. There are nursing positions in all kinds of medical facilities including hospitals, private organizations, clinics, non-profit groups, and many more. Some registered nurses decide to hang out a shingle as consultants or researchers. While there are currently more than three million nurses in the United States alone, more are needed. The current shortage is set to get even worse in the coming years. Becoming a nurse is a desirable job, but the positions simply cannot be filled fast enough, leaving many facilities short-handed. This makes nursing an excellent career option. The nursing salaries like the family nurse practitioner salary are going through the roof as well as being in demand like we said. You really need to look into this as an option.



The responsibilities of registered nurses center on assisting physicians in the health care of patients. They are also responsible for filing medical records, giving prescribed medications, and monitoring the patient. Nurse practitioners, on the other hand, have received more training and have taken more classes than the standard registered nurse, which means they can diagnose illnesses, write prescriptions for drugs, and work without physician approval for most tasks. Nurse practitioners can also train future nurses.



There are several levels under the title of registered nurse. One of those levels, the nurse practitioner, mandates further education. The role of nurse practitioner is the same as a doctor in many regards. They can diagnose and treat illnesses and prescribe drugs and other treatments. Nurse practitioners are also allowed to establish private practices in certain states.



Anyone can fall sick. Thus the scope of nursing covers a wide range of people from different sections of society. In particular, nurses are needed in medical facilities, clinics, community centers, schools, and even in patients' homes.



Your future as a nurse will begin in the same manner as every other nurse, regardless of your end goal. You need to devote yourself to rigorous preparation. That preparation requires you to pass a college admission test such as the American College Test (ACT) or the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). By achieving high marks on either the SAT or ACT, you will be able to choose to attain a bachelor's or an associate's degree, or a nursing diploma. Students will learn the hands-on care of patients as well as more theoretical and administrative instruction with the upper level degree programs. All will require an internship at a hospital. Major courses are chemistry, physiology, anatomy, nutrition, and nursing. Getting a bachelor's degree will give you a wider variety of job opportunities, because you will get more training in your four years than you would get in a two-year or three-year program. Besides these programs, master's and doctoral degrees are great options to further your nursing education.



After high school you have several paths from which to choose, including a two year associate's degree, a nursing study that spans three years, a bachelor's degree, or a master's degree. If you intend to be a nurse practitioner, you will need to get a master's degree. The master's and bachelor's paths encompass scientific, theoretical study to prepare a student for patient care and administration. The diploma and associate degree courses, meanwhile, offer mainly practical experience in patient care. You can always pursue further education later in your career. Regardless of your path, it is important that you study with an institution that is recognized by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission.



The mandatory exam that you need to clear to become a qualified nurse is the NCLEX-RN exam or the federal nursing exam. Periodic license renewal is mandatory in all states, sometimes requiring continuing education classes. Nurses who change states may sometimes need to appear for a test in the new state. The Nursing Board can advise you if you need to write a qualifying exam to practice in a particular state.



Once you finish your schooling and have passed the exam, you will need to take steps to gain make yourself more hirable. For starters, get hands-on experience. Try volunteering for the local clinic, hospital, or the Red Cross. This will give you an inside look at the responsibilities of nurses, which will, in turn, give you more qualifications to list on your resume. It will also train you how to react better in real-life situations. You can continue to improve your skills and training by working toward a higher degree or attempting advanced certification programs.



Anyone who feels the need to assist people who are sick or injured should take steps to gain the skills required to become a nurse so those compassionate characteristics can be put to good use. Make an effort to acquire the required competence and extend that to your actual service as a registered nurse.


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